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Generation Z Exhibition Private View

When Oct 11, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where Centre of African Studies
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A photography exhibition by Kerstin Hacker

The exhibition will run until 21 December 2018

The photographic series Generation Z documents the changing urban experience in Lusaka, the capital of Zambia.

Generation Z combines the acknowledgement of Hacker’s own European visual heritage with the experience of extended stays in Lusaka. She asks viewers to contemplate change in Zambia and dismantle neocolonial visual discourses.

In August 2017, the Generation Z series was exhibited at the Henry Tayali Gallery in Zambia, by invitation of the Visual Arts Council of Zambia. The Generation Z series was originally aimed at a British audience, however, it also sparked debate amongst Zambian photographers on how to develop methods of showing a wider, more diverse view, which highlights the country’s unique character. The discussions highlighted that Zambia’s visual identity outside the country, and to some extent within the country, is often based on a stereotypical African narrative, which was felt not to reflect life experienced within Zambia. It is therefore not a question of if Generation Z represents of modern Africa ‘correctly’, but if they contribute to the debate on how Zambia could be represented.

These images debate the dangers of neo-liberal consumerism on African culture and what this means to the people of Zambia, but also illustrated the visual ‘proof’ of the so often demanded economic progress of an African nation. It highlights the chasm between Zambians’ daily experience of their urban lives in Lusaka, and the photographs they see of themselves in the international media. Generation Z was photographed in Lusaka in 2016 – 17.

Kerstin Hacker is a photo documentarist and academic. Her work is published and exhibited internationally. She is a recipient of the Agfa/Emma Female Photojournalist of the Year Award, is an Alexia Foundation alumna and is a Fellow of the Research Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP).

Her long-term research interests explore the changing perception, representation and visual self-governance in Africa. Her current research explores the emerging middle class in Lusaka, Zambia. While working on her own photographic project, she also works with a group of Zambian photographers and academics, who are in the process of establishing art education projects. As part of this ongoing development, Hacker has been running photography workshops for professional photographers with the Visual Arts Council Zambia exploring how photography could contribute to the development of a visual identity of a developing country like Zambia and how it can foster its visual self-governance. Hacker is also mentoring young Zambian photographers and academics.

Kerstin was born in Bavaria/Germany in 1968. She holds a BA and MA from FAMU (Academy of Applied Arts), Prague, Czech Republic. Since 2008 she is Senior Lecturer and Course Leader for Photography at the Cambridge School of Art, Anglia Ruskin University.

kerstinhacker.org

Exhibition organised by Art at the ARB

CAS Open Seminar: Prof Megan Vaughan, UCL - Metabolic disorder, global health and ‘noncommunicable’ disease in Malawi

When Oct 15, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where S1, Alison Richard Building
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This paper examines how the concept of ‘metabolic disorder’ or ‘metabolic syndrome’ has been applied to the collection of global health metrics on ‘noncommunicable’ disease in Malawi. It argues that though the contemporary science of metabolism points to complexity and contingency, its application in this context has led to a narrowing in understanding of the drivers of epidemiological change. I point to some alternative understandings of these changes and also draw briefly on the insights gained from interviews with older Malawians. The latter highlight two related issues : exposure to chemical pollutants and accelerated growth.

CAS Open Seminar: Dr Herbert Muyinda, Makerere University - Policy of No Policy: Disability and Technology Translation Dilemmas in Uganda

When Oct 22, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where S1, Alison Richard Building
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Globally, technology is considered to be a means to finding solutions to problem(s), and for impaired bodies, it is meant to compensate for the non-functionality or loss of part(s) of a body. In most Sub-Saharan countries, assistive technologies are characterized by scarcity; a gap between what governments can provide in the public health facilities, and what persons with disabilities need. The African governments have for long been reluctant, despite adequate evidence, to come up with policies that can help fill the healthcare gap; a political ambivalence I refer to as ‘policy of no policy’. Most technologies used in the developing countries are made in the developed (western) world, and due to scarcity, developing countries tend to take all forms of technologies ‘thrown’ to them. This technology gets deeply entangled with institutional and political, moral, ethical, and professional processes, to the detriment of every day needs and hopes of disabled persons and their families. This not only leads to unforeseen and often severe consequences including secondary disabilities, it forces persons with disabilities into dilemmas of how to adapt the western assistive technologies. Basing on extensive field research in Uganda, in this paper I will examine the critical issue of translating technologies by persons with disabilities in the context of ‘policy of no policy’, and the dilemmas involved. I will argue that the tendency for many Sub-Saharan countries including Uganda to resort to the policy of ‘no policy’ as a strategy to deal with the healthcare gaps, makes the process of translating technologies by persons with disabilities, and other vulnerable persons a dilemma. In the process the existent competences of the target populations are disregarded, leaving potentially highly promising solutions unutilized.

 

CAS Open Seminar: Dr Jean-Benoît Falisse, University of Edinburgh - Power, authority, and community participation in primary health-care centres: contrasting evidence from health facility committees in South Kivu (DR Congo) and Burundi

When Nov 19, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where S1, Alison Richard Building
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Since the 1987 Bamako Initiative, community participation has become a mainstream approach for managing primary health-care in Africa. There is, however, little empirical evidence that local participatory institutions ultimately improve service provision, and health in general. This paper considers the case of the elected health facility committees (the comités de santé), the quintessential institution of community governance in health, in the contexts of rural Burundi and the province of South Kivu, DR Congo, between 2011 and 2014. It focuses on the effects of a project implemented by ministries of health and aid organisations, which supported and trained health committee members.
Using a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods --including interviews, grey document analysis, and a randomised control trial-- stark differences are found between cases: training the committees led to remarkable improvements in primary health-care management in South Kivu, but much less so in Burundi. The core of the paper discusses this very visible difference; it argues that an oft-neglected, yet critical, element to the efficiency of community participation initiatives in health is ordinary people's relationship to medical and non-medical authority. Diverse experiences of war and violence, distinct histories of autocratic rule, and different types of settlements suggest that this relationship is more horizontal in South Kivu, where power is openly contested and discussed, than in Burundi.

CAS Open Seminar: Dr Sloan Mahone, University of Oxford - Memories of Ashura: A photographic essay from Zanzibar before and after the Revolution

When Nov 26, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where S1, Alison Richard Building
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Each year on Ashura (the 10th day of the month of Moharrum in the Islamic calendar), Muslims commemorate the death of the Prophet’s grandson, Husain, at the Battle of Karbala in 680 AD. For Shia Muslims, this commemoration takes the form of intense mourning for martyrs. For certain sects, like the Ithna-asheri, feeling the pain of the martyrs involves feeling pain themselves. Most dramatically such pain is often induced by self-flagellation with chain-whips during a religious procession.  This paper focuses on the commemoration of Ashura by the Ithna-asheri of Zanzibar, and is based around a sequence of photographs of an Ashura procession taken there in 1957 by Dr Edward Margetts, a Canadian psychiatrist and photographer who was based in Kenya in the late 1950s. Since the revolution of 1964 many of Zanzibar’s Ithna-asheri fled the island, but these original photographs, matched with more recent images from the same processional route, offer a vivid portrait of an Ashura procession and document a time and a place in the history of this community now looked back on with much nostalgia.

 

CAS Open Seminar: Prof Brigit Obrist, University of Basel - Towards a Relational Understanding of Participation in Social Health Protection

When Oct 29, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where S1, Alison Richard Building
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We live in an age of participation. In the field of global development, the biggest players have invested massively in participatory approaches; and they now propagate participation as a crucial principle to reach the Sustainable Development Goals 2015-2030. One of the priority goals on the SDG agenda is Universal Health Coverage, defined as providing all people with access to essential health services - without financial hardship. In order to reach this goal, the International Labor Office, the World Bank and the World Health Organization push social health protection as a key strategy. Social health protection measures include different health financing protection mechanisms, from tax-based financing, statutory social health insurance to private health insurance, community-based health insurance, and various fee exemptions for health services. Politicians, policy makers and implementers call on the public to participate in these measures. My task as a scholar is of course not to promote participation in social health protection but to critically examine it as a social process. Many scholars of diverse disciplinary backgrounds - including anthropologists - have discussed participation controversially, pointing for instance to the ambivalences, dilemma and paradoxes of participation. I try to push our analytical understanding a step further by introducing a relational or figuration-inspired perspective. In this view, we can examine, for instance, how actors produce social health protection through participation in specific networks. We can further study how and why actors create, regulate, prescribe and obstruct participation of other actors in separate as well as interconnected social protection networks. My discussion of these and related questions is grounded in empirical examples brought forth by ethnographic field research in Tanzania. Contemporary Tanzania presents a particularly interesting case for studying participation in social health protection in this more analytical sense because of the country’s long and deep normative engagement with participatory development and the current government’s aspiration to transform Tanzania into a middle-income country with Universal Health Coverage.

CAS Open Seminar: Prof Ibrahim Abdullah, University of Sierra Leone - Problematizing The Ebola Virus Disease in the Mano River Basin: Sierra Leone Health Infrastructure on the Eve of Ebola

When Nov 05, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where S1, Alison Richard Building
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The responsibility for responding to outbreaks of infectious diseases like EVD is shared by national governments, regional health agencies, and international organisations. The communication and cooperation between these parties have been vital in containing previous outbreaks of EVD. The failure of communication, cooperation, and action in the MRU epidemic underlies some of the core questions of the MRU experience. Why, in this era of globalization, ubiquitous information, and super-fast communication, was the accumulated knowledge and expertise around EVD not quickly utilized in the case of the MRU countries? Why were local communities, the national public health systems, and governments in Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia unable to respond effectively to the spread of the outbreak? Why did international organisations, especially the World Health Organisation (WHO), the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Medecins San Frontieres (MSF), which had been instrumental and relatively successful in curtailing previous outbreaks, fail to contain the initial outbreak in late 2013 and early 2014? What did it take to get MRU governments, the international organisations, and the international community in general to respond robustly to the epidemic? How did the EVD outbreak of 2013-2015 become the largest, most widespread and deadliest in history, infecting more than 28,616 and Killing 11,310 people?  What was it about the MRU EVD outbreak that was different? This lecture will attempt to provide answers to these questions by looking at the broken health infrastructure in Sierra Leone on the eve of the MRU EVD.

CAS Open Seminar: Atomic Junction: The Road to Nuclear Power by Abena Dove Osseo-Asare (documentary film, 30 mins)

When Nov 12, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where S1, Alison Richard Building
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Atomic Junction is a nexus of roadways leading to the offices of the Ghana Atomic Energy Association. Buses plying the road announce "Atomic, Atomic, Atomic" to let passengers know their direction of travel. But what are scientists actually doing behind the gates of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission? In this film, director Abena Dove Osseo-Asare speaks with scientists, neighborhood entrepreneurs, and traditional leaders for their perspectives on the past, present, and future of life on the Atomic-Haatso road. Central to their discussions are the inherent dangers of radiation, the value of land in the area, and the promise of nuclear power. Come to a screening and presentation on the research behind the film with Professor Osseo-Asare. She will discuss strategies for using visual documentary to collect oral histories of scientific life in Ghana, Afrofuturism and the prospects of nuclear technology in African countries, and the ongoing risks along the Atomic-Haatso road including a recent explosion.

Abena Dove Osseo-Asare is Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin where she teaches courses in the history of science and African studies. She also holds a courtesy appointment in Population Health at the Dell Medical School. Professor Osseo-Asare received her PhD and AB from the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University. Her first book, Bitter Roots: The Search for Healing Plants in Africa received several awards including the Herskovits Prize from the African Studies Association. She is completing a study of Ghana's civilian nuclear program, Atomic Junction: Nuclear Power after Independence (under contract with Cambridge University Press). Professor Osseo-Asare’s research has been funded by the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, National Science Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, and Hellman Foundation. She serves on the editorial boards of Endeavour and Social History of Medicine.

 

Postgraduate Open Day 2018

When Nov 02, 2018
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The Open Day for students interested in coming to Cambridge to study on a postgraduate course will be on Friday 2 November 2018.

The University of Cambridge Postgraduate Open day is open to current final year students or graduates who are seeking to enter into postgraduate study at Masters or PhD level.  

During the day there will be detailed information about the graduate application process. Current graduate students and Graduate Admissions staff will be on hand to answer questions about postgraduate study and student life in the vibrant city of Cambridge. Staff will also be available to give you advice on the application process, funding opportunities and careers after your course.

You will have the chance to speak to department staff at the Exhibition Hub and you may be able to visit the department to learn more about individual courses and discover which course will be best for you by talking to the staff and students here.

You will also have the opportunity to visit some of the Colleges, find out about their unique character and see how College life complements academic life in Cambridge.

There is no charge for attending the open day although you will need to arrange your own travel and accommodation if required.

 Graduate Study website

CAS Annual Reception 2018

When Oct 08, 2018
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where The Atrium, Alison Richard Building
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Please join us in celebrating the beginning of the academic year! Drinks and nibbles will be served from 5pm. All welcome.