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Related Events

Related Events

The Inquiry hopes to promote many related staff and students events that take place around the University. If your student group , society or department is hosting a related even we would love to share these details on our page. Please contact the Project Administrator ( ss2699@cam.ac.uk) to share details.

 

The Post-Windrush Generation: Black British Voices of Resistance

21 May 2021 - 22 May 2021

Newnham College, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 9DF

Please go to the CRASSH webpage for additional information http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/29232

 

Lead Convenor

Kenny Monrose 
 

Co-Convenors

Joseph Cotton
Isabelle Higgins
 

Speakers

Kehinde Andrews (Birmingham City University)
Robert Beckford (Canterbury Christ Church University)
Dennis Bovell (Record Producer and Musician)
Paul Gilroy (University College London)
Martin Glynn (Birmingham City University)
Colin Grant (Author)
William 'Lez' Henry (University of West London)
Michael Macmillan (University of the Arts London)
Kenny Monrose (University of Cambridge)
H Patton (Canterbury Christ Church)
Levi Tafari (Charles University)
Joy White (University of Bedford)
 

Summary
This event will host leading academics, performers and commentators to chronicle the muted and thorny legacy of race relations in the UK, and the manner in which the Post-Windrush generation have tirelessly fought for recognition, from Thatcherism to Brexit and beyond. As well as academic enquiry, performative art will lie at the core of this event, as performance has acted a mechanism by which members of the Post-Windrush generation have negotiated multiple layers of discrimination in order to establish a foothold within British society.
The conference will provide an audio-visual journey of New Commonwealth migration to Britain with the arrival of the Empire Windrush in 1948, and will highlight many of the hidden struggles for equal rights and social justice, including the recent very public scandals that have shamed this Government by exposing how whiteness is used to militate against black people. The impact of black contributions to what is now regarded as contemporary British lifestyles and culture, beyond the realms of entertainment and fashion will also be debated in tandem with the ongoing effect of colonialism and imperialism on black life in Britain.

 

Award winnng author and former MPhil in African Studies student Mary Ononokpono talks about how her work has been inspired by our MPhil programme