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ANR XenAfPol Closing Conference: The Politics of Xenophobic Exclusion; Mobilisations, Local Orders and Violence

16-18 December 2013

Seminar Room S1, Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge

This is the closing conference of an international research programme (XenAfPol) focusing on the politics of xenophobic exclusion in Africa. It makes use of the word "xenophobia" as a generic key word with the intention to problematise the multiple meanings of the various notions associated with it (autochthony, nativism, indigenenity and even ethnicity) in the struggles for a redefinition of citizenship. The four countries selected (Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa) have all witnessed recent outbreaks of xenophobic violence. As opposed to studies of national context, our emphasis is on local and urban scales as xenophobic and autochthonous practices by definition rely on struggles over local political leadership, claims over localised resources and competing definitions of belonging to a certain territory. Drawing on extensive empirical research undertaken over the past three years, this conference will document how processes of exclusion based on religious, ethnic, national, and local forms of belonging are contested, disputed, ignored or fought against by a number of actors.


Programme:

Monday 16 December

9:00 Registration & Welcome

  • Harri Englund (Director Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge)
  • Adam Higazi (Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge)
  • Laurent Fourchard (LAM, Sciences Po Bordeaux & Aurelia Segatti, African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand, coordinators of ANR XenAfPol Project)

9:30 – 13:00 The Making and Unmaking of Insiders and Outsiders

Chair: Laurent Fourchard

  • Adam Higazi (Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge, and Jimam Lar, University of Bayreuth), Managing difference: understanding patterns of conflict and co-existence in Bauchi and Gombe states, North-East Nigeria
  • Rufus Akinyele (Department of History, University of Lagos), Lagos is our Land: Indigeneship associations and the protection of the rights of Lagosians since 1950
  • Sandrine Vinckel (University of Paris 1), The Memory of Xenophobic Violence and Everyday Interactions between Katangese and Kasaïans during the November 2011 Election Time in Likasi and Kolwezi (DRC)

Discussant: Dr David Pratten (African Studies Centre, University of Oxford)

14:00 – 17:00 Place, Institutions and the Making of Difference

Chair: Richard Banégas

  • Laurent Fourchard (Les Afriques dans le Monde, Sciences Po Bordeaux), The bureaucratization of autochthony: producing and bypassing certificates of indigenes in Nigeria
  • Miriam Di Paola (African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand), A labour perspective on xenophobia in South Africa. A case study of the Metals and Engineering industry in Ekurhuleni
  • Caitlin Blaser (African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand), Xenophobia, government and local politics In South Africa

Discussant: Ruth Watson (Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge)

17:30 – 18:30 Public Lecture

Peter Geschiere

A Global Conjuncture of Belonging? Autochthony and its Different Trajectories Since the Post-Cold War Moment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday 17 December

9:00 – 13:00 Violent Mobilisation, Exclusion Techniques and the Production of Difference

Chair: Aurelia Segatti

  • Philip Olayoku (Peace and Conflict Studies Programme, University of Ibadan), The politics of exclusion and xenophobic relations among the residents of Zangon Kataf, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Tamlyn Monson (Sociology Department, London School of Economics), Violence and the borders of citizenship: squatter politics and violence against foreigners in South Africa

Discussants: Egodi Uchendu (Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge and Olly Owen, University of Oxford)

Break

  • Caroline Kihato (African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand), Go back and tell them who the real men are! Gendering our understanding of Kibera’s violence (to be confirmed)
  • Jacques Tshibwabwa-Kuditshini (Department of Political and Administrative Studies, University of Kinshasa), Invasion-rébellion, mobilisations violentes et exclusion en République Démocratique du Congo: Kinshasa et la chasse aux Tutsi

Discussant: Peter Geschiere Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Amsterdam


14:00 – 16:00 Insurgent Citizenship and new Political Subjectivities

Chair: Adam Higazi

  • David Pratten (African Studies Centre, University of Oxford), Youth, gangs and exclusion in Nigeria: Between generative and insurgent politics
  • Aurelia Segatti (African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand), “Mobutu’s Ghost”: Mobilising against foreign retailers in Kinshasa (DRC). Indigenization, autochthony and emerging urban subjectivities

Discussant: Richard Banégas (CERI-Science Po)


Wednesday 18 December

9:00 – 11:00 State Responses to Xenophobia

Chair: Rufus Akinyele

  • Lydie Cabane (Les Afriques dans le Monde, Sciences Po Bordeaux), Protecting the ‘most vulnerable’? Disaster, migrants and the reach of the state in South Africa
  • Prisca Kamungi (African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand), Autochthony, territoriality and solutions to internal displacement in Kenya

Discussant: Emma Hunter (Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge)

11:30 – 13:30 Final discussion

Chairs: Laurent Fourchard & Aurelia Segatti

Final overview Wale Adebanwi (African American and African Studies, UC Davies and Centre for African Studies, University of Cambridge)

General discussion and way forward